PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY OF INFECTION CAUSED BY SARS-COV-2

Cover Page
  • Authors: Kogan E.A.1, Berezovsky Y.S.2, Protsenko D.D.1, Bagdasaryan T.R.2, Gretsov E.M.2, Demura S.A.1, Demyashkin G.A.1, Kalinin D.V.3, Kukleva A.D.1, Kurilina E.V.4, Nekrasova T.P.1, Paramonova N.B.1, Ponomarev A.B.1, Radenska-Lopovok S.G.1, Semyonova L.A.2, Tertychny A.S.1
  • Affiliations:
    1. I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University
    2. Central Tuberculosis Research Institute
    3. A. V. Vishnevsky National Medical Research Center
    4. National Medical Research Center of Cardiology
  • Issue: Vol 6, No 2 (2020)
  • Pages: 8-30
  • Section: PROFESSIONAL REVIEW
  • URL: http://for-medex.ru/jour/article/view/308
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.19048/2411-8729-2020-6-2-8-30

Abstract


Autopsy data from 80 patients who died of the COVID-19 infection were analysed. Using macro- and microscopic studies, specific features of pathological processes in various organs were identified. The obtained experimental data, along with information from literature sources, allowed conclusions to be drawn about the mechanisms of damaging internal organs and body systems, as well as assumptions to be made about individual links in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. The thanatogenesis of the disease and the main causes of death are discussed, including acute cardiopulmonary failure, acute renal failure, pulmonary thromboembolism, shock involving multiple organ failure and sepsis. The critical importance of autopsy is emphasized, which provides valuable information on the morphological substrate for this infection closely associated with possible clinical manifestations.

About the authors

E. A. Kogan

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1107-3753

Russian Federation

Dr. Sci. (Med.), Prof., Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences (RANS), Head of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy,

Moscow

Yu. S. Berezovsky

Central Tuberculosis Research Institute

Email: report-q@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5904-0021

Russian Federation

Head of the Pathology Department,

Moscow

D. D. Protsenko

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

Author for correspondence.
Email: chief@medprint.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5851-2768

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy,

Moscow

T. R. Bagdasaryan

Central Tuberculosis Research Institute

Email: cniit@ctri.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9910-1570

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Chief Physician,

Moscow

E. M. Gretsov

Central Tuberculosis Research Institute

Email: gem2505@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2337-4692

Russian Federation

Pathologist,

Moscow

S. A. Demura

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9717-5496

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy, 

Moscow

G. A. Demyashkin

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8447-2600

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy,

Moscow

D. V. Kalinin

A. V. Vishnevsky National Medical Research Center

Email: dmitry.v.kalinin@gmail.com
ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6247-9481

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Head of the Pathology Department,

Moscow

A. D. Kukleva

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6690-3347

Russian Federation

Postgraduate Student of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy, 

Moscow

E. V. Kurilina

National Medical Research Center of Cardiology

Email: ellakurilina@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3208-534X

Russian Federation

Head of the Pathology Department,

Moscow

T. P. Nekrasova

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6376-9392

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy,

Moscow

N. B. Paramonova

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5380-7113

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy, 

Moscow

A. B. Ponomarev

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4242-5723

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Assoc. Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy, 

Moscow

S. G. Radenska-Lopovok

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4669-260X

Russian Federation

Dr. Sci. (Med.), Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy,

Moscow

L. A. Semyonova

Central Tuberculosis Research Institute

Email: lu.kk@yandex.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1782-7763

Russian Federation

Cand. Sci. (Med.), Senior Researcher of the Department of Pathomorphology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry,

Moscow

A. S. Tertychny

I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University

ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5635-6100

Russian Federation

Dr. Sci. (Med.), Prof. of the A. I. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy, 

Moscow

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